Home » Jewish Life You are browsing entries filed in “Jewish Life”

Understanding the Four Species

The Four Species (Arba’at Ha-Minim) which are branches of three plants and one type of fruit tied together. The Four Species is waved in a ceremony during Sukkot. This practice is considered mitzvah. Hadass – boughs from the myrtle tree. Hadass symbolizes the people who do good deeds but do not study the Torah. Lulav […]

| | Read More »

The Relevance of Sukkot

Sukkot is a seven-day festival which is celebrated by building Sukkah huts and waving the “Four Species” each day. Sukkot is one of the joyous holidays in Judaism. This is the best time to show God our strong faith and complete trust in him. The week of Sukkot is celebrated with the families spending time […]

| | Read More »

Teaching Kids to Appreciate Jewish Music

Jewish music has a long history and is an important part of Jewish culture. As a parent, it is our responsibility to expose our children to Jewish culture and tradition and these include Jewish music. Here are a few suggestions on how you can teach your kids to appreciate Jewish music as part of who […]

| | Read More »

The Hasidic Women – Why They Wear Wigs

Hasidic women wear clothing that is according to the principles of dress modesty in Jewish law. Haredi women wear long, conservative skirts. They also wear sleeves past the elbow. Hasidic women strictly follow the laws of tzenuit. They are also required to act accordingly and with respectable behavior. Married women cover their hair with a […]

| | Read More »

Preparing the Maror for Passover Seder

The maror is a bitter herb eaten at the Passover Seder. It symbolizes the slavery of the Israelites in Egypt and is a Torah commandment “with bitter herbs they shall eat it.” (Exodus 12:8). During the seder, a blessing is recited over the maror before eating it. The maror is dipped into the charoset, which […]

| | Read More »

The Passover Seder Plate

The Passover Seder is symbolic in nature. Each food eaten during the seder exemplifies the slavery that the ancient Jews endured in Egypt and their exodus to freedom. I have listed the food found in the Passover seder plate and what each food represents. Maror – these bitter herbs (usually horseradish or romaine lettuce) symbolize […]

| | Read More »

The Jewish Bris Ceremony

The Jewish religion is known for being unique. Every holiday is full of meaningful traditions that make every celebration special. Every life event is honored and celebrated in Judaism such as birth, adulthood, marriage and death. The bris is an important Jewish celebration because it is the very first life event celebrated in a Jewish […]

| | Read More »

Hoshana Rabbah : Conclusion of Sukkot

Hoshana Rabbah is the seventh day of Sukkot. This day is observed with a synagogue service. Hoshana Rabbah is a day of praise and worship. Hoshana Rabbah is the time when God sets the Book of Life. It is part of Jewish custom to greet your friends and loved ones with “piska tava” (a good […]

| | Read More »

Food for Sukkot

Sukkot is a Jewish holiday which is celebrated with festive meals and parties. Since Sukkot is also known as a harvest festival, the foods served usually include stuffed dishes, fruits and vegetables as a way to thank God for the good harvest. Serving stuffed food during Sukkot is part of Jewish tradition. Stuffed food served […]

| | Read More »

The Joy of Sukkot

Based on a Naaleh.com shiur by Rabbi Beinush Ginsburg. Why did Hashem command us to celebrate Sukkot in Tishrei, during the fall season? In addition why is their a special mitzvah of simcha on this holiday? The Sefer Hachinuch writes that it is the time of chag haasif-the ingathering of the harvest. There is natural joy at […]

| | Read More »

Men and women dating over fifties

Age is always an issue when it comes to love, some people might say it’s not a big deal, but it is. Especially if the person you’re interested in is not your peer. The good thing about the issues of the heart is that, you can never be too young or too old to experience […]

| | Read More »

Jewish Living: Sabbath

The word Sabbath derives from the Hebrew Shabbat which means to cease or stop. It was derived first in the Biblical entries of Genesis, telling the story of the seven days of Creation. Sabbath is observed as the seventh day of the week, on which we are required to rest, in remembrance of the creation […]

| | Read More »

Divorced moms and dads

Putting an end to a marriage is very intricate for most husbands and wives to do. Many former couples to be, find it a burden to process papers and attend hearings that cost a huge sums of money, the tormenting feeling, seeing the children having to choose between mom and dad, and it’s very challenging […]

| | Read More »

The Afikoman for the Passover Seder

Afikoman which means “that which comes after” or “dessert,” is half of the piece of matzo which is broken at the early stage of the Passover Seder. This is set aside and is eaten as dessert after meal. Back in the era of the First and Second Temples, the afikoman was the last thing eaten […]

| | Read More »

A Healthy Passover Meal

Who says you can’t enjoy Passover even if you are on a diet. Preparing for a healthy Passover Seder meal is easy with these simple steps: Instead of meat, serve fish. Fish makes a perfect main course. It is high in protein and less in fats and cholesterol. You can serve Cereal-coated Fish Fillet or […]

| | Read More »

Best Gifts for the Jewish Mom

Your mom is celebrating her birthday and you have no idea what to give her. She seems to have everything she needs. Every mom’s birthday is a perfect time to express the love and appreciation you have for your mother. More often than not, Jewish gifts specifically made for moms are hard to find but […]

| | Read More »

Jewish Cooking: Homemade Lox

Jewish cooking is a mix of cooking styles from many cultures (Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Spanish, German and Eastern European). One favorite Jewish dish is lox (cured salmon fillet). Lox is usually served on a bagel and is served with cream cheese and capers. Lox was introduced to the United States by Eastern European Jewish immigrants. […]

| | Read More »

Jewish Shiva: the first seven days of mourning

Shiva is a week long period of mourning done immediately after the funeral of a close relative which includes the father, mother, siblings, sons, daughters and spouse; they assume the role of “Halakhic” from the Hebrew word, which means mourner. Shiva is simply the Hebrew word for seven. The seven-day period of mourning gives the […]

| | Read More »

Traditional Jewish ceremonies

Baby naming ceremonies Every individual is born different. They say that no two individuals are alike, twins may look identical, but not everything about them is the same. But what’s special and unique about each and every one of us, is our names. One of the most exciting times for a parent is naming their […]

| | Read More »

Jewish Marriage Tradition: The Seven Blessings

A traditional Jewish wedding includes the recitation of the Sheva Brachot. This is also known as birkot Nesium which are seven blessings for the couple as part of nissuin. These blessings are recited by a Hazzan or Rabbi or the wedding guests. This is said over a cup of wine which is passed to the […]

| | Read More »

Jewish Traditions and the Bar Mitzvah

In Judaism, the Bar Mitzvah is an important time in a Jewish man’s life when he is given his own Jewish identity and his coming of age is celebrated. During this important time in a Jewish boy’s life, it is important to consolidate Jewish traditions into the Bar Mitzvah. Give the boy a tallit or […]

| | Read More »

Why Celebrate the Passover?

Passover is probably one of the most recognized words when you talk about Judaism. Passover is an important part of the Jewish religion. It is based on the story of the Israelites who were freed from slavery in Egypt. We celebrate Passover to remember the freedom of our ancestors, their redemption form the hands of […]

| | Read More »

How to Make Rosh Hashanah Greeting Cards

Many people believe that Rosh Hashanah is the time when people are judged according to how they have lived their lives and are entered into the Book of Life for another year. Rosh Hashanah is a great time to greet people and one way to do this is by sending your loved ones a Rosh […]

| | Read More »

Gift Ideas for Jewish Baby Naming Ceremonies

If you’ve been invited to a Jewish baby naming ceremony, it is proper to bring a gift. There are lots of choices available in local shops for baby items and even online but if you want yours to be special, here are a few tips: The most basic items that you can choose are those […]

| | Read More »

Naming a Jewish Baby

Judaism plays an important role in naming a Jewish child. A Hebrew name is usually given to a child. This Hebrew name is considered as the child’s real name by which God calls him. There are many customs followed in Jewish baby naming ceremonies. Ashkenazi Jews name a child after a deceased loved one. This […]

| | Read More »

How to Observe Yom Ha’atzma’ut

Yom Ha’atzma’ut is a Jewish holiday commemorating Israel’s independence in 1948. This holiday is usually celebrated on or around the 5th day of the Jewish month of Iyar. Hallel should be said on Yom Ha’atzma’ut as well as Psalm 113-118. During the holiday morning, a portion of the Haftarah should be read. Torah reading is […]

| | Read More »

The Shema Yisrael

Shema Yisrael or Shema are parts of the section of the Torah and are highlighted in the morning and evening Jewish prayer services. “Hear, O Israel, the Lord of our God, the Lord is one.” (Deuteronomy 6:4) Shema is considered as the most important prayer by many observant Jews. The Shema is an expression of […]

| | Read More »

Mincha: The Jewish Afternoon Prayer

Mincha or the Jewish afternoon prayer is the shortest prayer of the day usually said before sunset. Prayers of Mincha include: Ashrei Uva Letzion (during Shabbat and Yom Tov) Amidah Torah reading (during Shabbat and public fast days) Aleinu Tachanun (excluded during Shabbat, Yom Tov and certain festive days) Tzidkatcha Tzedek (during Shabbat) Since Mincha […]

| | Read More »

The Blessing of Wearing a Kippah

In other culture, removing one’s hat is an act of proper etiquette, especially when meeting someone, or when entering one’s home. In Judaism, wearing a kippah is a great sign of respect. The essence of wearing a kippah is indicated in the blessing we say every morning when we thank God for “crowning Israel with […]

| | Read More »

Jewish Music

Jewish Religious Music Just as Judaism is a beautiful religion, its music is colorful and diverse. Jewish music is mostly religious in nature though modern Jewish music, although some still religious vary from classical, romantic, and folk music. Religious Jewish music is synagogal and cantorial. The earliest Jewish music was patterned from the one used […]

| | Read More »